Halifax’s Growing Container Business Prompts New Plans of Expansion

Halifax, one of the fastest growing Canadian cities, has a lot at stake today to keep things moving forward. And the Canadian city is leaving no stone unturned at that.

The growing volume of container business in Halifax is giving a boost to the economy of Nova Scotia. But there are some apprehensions about the ports ability to handle the large scale trade operations.

Understanding Halfax’s Growth in the Container Vessel Industry

Halifax recorded a sharp growth in business in the first half just like 2016 and ranked on top of all major ports in Canada. A staggering 16.7% increase in container volume was recorded compared to last year amounting to approximately 274,650 TEU. Canada was always known for its shipping industry, however, there is one more developing economy branch it is famous for. Canadian gambling industry is becoming more wide-spread, that is why you can easily have some looking in ValleyGames activities guide, providing a wide range of popular online casino.

Halifax featured in the North America’s Top 25 Ports last year as the fastest growing and has secured a north-south service and two trans-Pacific services since that time. The overall growth in container business volume in Canada was 15% as revealed by Jack Mahoney, president of Maersk Line Canada.

The largest ever container vessel to dock at Halifax port in June had the ability to transport over 10,000 containers when presented in 20-tonne-equivalent units. The humongous ship Zim Antwerp used the Halterm container terminal located at the south end of Halifax. Many such ships have been had been benefitted from the Panama Canal widening making the plying of huge container vessels a reality. The spike in container traffic has made Halifax East Coast’s one of the fastest growing ports.

The port of Halifax does not require any dredging as it is a deep water, ice free port. This makes it capable of transporting cargo to the markets of US and Canada in a quick and efficient manner. But there are some issues like inadequate road or rail network that hampers the transport of goods to central US and Canada in a timely manner.

There are some plans to tackle the situation. One strategy is to transform the container activities to Imperial Oil refinery across the harbor. But this will add considerable volume of rail and road traffic towards downtown Dartmouth. The additional movement of trucks on the ever congested Highway 111 is going to make the situation worse. Interestingly, the highway is called as Circumferential Highway!

Another plan hovers around including the Ceres terminal operation by expanding the current Halterm facility to Point Pleasant Park. Whichever plan is adopted, the expenses are going to range high for Halifax Port Corp., the federal crown corporation and could run into billions.

The Cape Breton municipality also has its own strategy which involves setting up a container terminal located at Point Edward region to distribute the container business of Halifax. Situated across the Sydney harbor, the port requires dredging and it is not ice free. There are talks of another container terminal at Nova Scotia that could come up in Guysborough County at Melford.

Only time will tell which plans are adopted but the container business in Halifax and Canada is going through good times.

The Corporations Of Canadian Seaways: Managing the Right Way

The Canadian waterways are a huge system which is full of vessels going back and forth at all hours of the day. In this kind of a scenario where the traffic is so high, you need a corporation which manages all these efficiently.

is one of the biggest names all over the world. This is a given, due to the fact that it governs over the Canadian Seaway. Canada owns one of the largest coastlines in the world and these seaways also consist of 13 of the 15 locks that fall between Montreal and Lake Erie.

The SLSMC is responsible for the safe and smooth movement of all cargo vessels over the Canadian waters. It also operates on a completely non-profit basis. The SLSMC shares its responsibility with the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation which is the Seaway management system of the United States of America.

Canada and USA also have a very close relationship when it comes to the imports and exports connecting them. Both corporations go hand in hand in affairs of the ports and the seaway. These include responsiveness to the alerts and needs of the vessels and workers, seeing to the necessities of agencies and service providers around the ports and fulfilling the requirements that the provincial and state jurisdiction defines.

The Seaway Dream

The SLSMC strives to be efficient and up-to-date with all their duties and responsibilities. Their goal is to give safe, quick, efficient, and environment-friendly transport of vessel through the waterway. They also work diligently towards developing and growing the Canadian economy in a sustainable way.

They also have a goal of keeping the trade alive with minimal impact on the marine life and ecosystem of the oceans. Our world is connected in the most intricate way and they have realized in time that the need for preserving the environment is very high.

Connecting The World

They connect North America with the world in a risk-free way. According to the reports on the website of the Seaway system, these waterways oversee a total annual commerce of 200 million tonnes.

For every ton of this huge quantity almost a hundred different people coming together and working hard day and night. The collective effort of these people is the reason behind the smooth functioning of the docks. There is a huge number of people working both shore side and on the waters.

These include dock workers, ship chandlers, and vessel agents and on the sea, we have coast guards, port officials and terminal operators.

The vessels that come through these ports can be largely divided into three groups, the bulk carriers called “Lakers”, the salties or ocean ships, and tug-propelled barges. These waters connect all parts of the world through trade.

What’s Fishy In Canada: Understanding the Fish Economy

Canada is the proud owner of the world’s longest coastline stretching over a whopping 243,000 km. These waters bring almost 21,000 international ships to the ports of Canada carrying goods and passengers alike. Given the level of importance that marine commerce poses in a country like Canada, they are the founders of the International Maritime Organization.

The IMO is an organization that governs and regulates the marine shipping sector of the entire world. As of 2009, Canada has registered a total of more than 324 major ports and harbours.

If you’re looking to find everything to know about the current status of the commercial marine industry of Canada, go no further. From time immemorial, the citizens of Canada have had a close relationship with the marine life – and many cities like St. John in New Brunswick had flourished with a good sea trade. Sure, Canadians not only work but can know how to have a good rest. And fishing around for entertainment often leads them to one of the popular places to have fun: online casino hub at NBSO website (si vous parlez français, vous pourrez toujours vous amuser et trouver un casino en ligne à votre goût). There everybody can find what he’s looking for.

From schooners to icebreakers, Canadians are familiar with one end of the spectrum to the other. The industry includes a large number of shipyards, specialized equipment manufacturers and ports of the Canadian shores.

Shipping And Economy

The blooming of marine commerce has greatly helped along in boosting the economy of Canada. The Chamber of Marine Commerce or (CMC) is the bi-national representative under whom the entire marine commerce industry of the Great Lakes St. Lawrence territory comes. Prominent international and domestic shipbuilders, marine vessel operators, the ports of Canada and United States, logistic companies, terminals and elevators all come under the CMC. They are, in essence, an all-encompassing umbrella for all marine related companies.

What’s The Big Deal With Marine Transport?

Let’s take a quick look at why marine commerce ergo marine transport is so important for the growth of an economy.

  • Cost effective: The shipping industry is one of the most effective ways to transport goods over long distances. The cost for transport is very less, especially when compared to the other methods available for long distance transport of commodities.
  • Safety and volume: You have shipping vessels that are resilient. They are also customized in a way that they can hold the largest possible amount of cargo. Shipping is also the safest way to ship gas, liquids and other sensitive substances. Of course, these containers will have to adhere to a set of safety requirements as well.
  • Reduction in loss: Losses incurred at the sea are much less than in other scenarios. In the last decade alone there is a clear sign that incidents at sea that resulted in the loss of cargo have dropped drastically.
  • Sustainable: Today, all of us strive to protect the environment so that there will be something left for the future generations to enjoy. The field of marine commerce only contributes to 12% of the pollution created by human economic activities. Thus, it is also in sync with the needs of the environment.

The Ports of Canada: All You Need to Know About Them

The marine industry of Canada has produced a phenomenal 93,000 employment opportunities. We can attribute a huge part of Canada’s income to their exports. Since 1994, the trade between Canada and USA has also blown up to huge proportions.

One out of every four Canadian citizen has a job based on foreign trade. Grain, iron and coal are just some of the commodities shipped from Canada to different parts of the world. In fact, cities like St. John traditionally supported port-based businesses with the Port of St. John occupying as much as 45 hectares of land.

Canada also has a slew of dry bulk carriers, tankers, general cargo vessels and ferries.  Other than these Canada also has a set of transportation services that carry passengers. Canada’s marine industry has also shown an increased effect on the influx on the tourism sector.

The Ins And Outs Of The Port

The ports in Canada have developed a well-oiled mechanism to carry out the functions around the docks. Once the vessels come in and drop anchor, the operators at the terminal schedule the dock workers for timely loading and unloading of the cargo. This ensures that there is no loss of time and thus loss of profit in the port.

These ports are also peppered with many firms which give supplies and repairs to the vessels when they are in need of it. This entire network makes sure that there is no delay on the work that is to be done on the vessels. There are also providers of equipment for proper handling of the cargo, containers and even the trucks used for transportation.

Government agencies and several regulations play a major part in ensuring that all the cargo that comes in and goes out are safe and up to regulations. Brokers are also available who give services in clearing the cargo and aids in storing and processing them.

The Point Where It All Connects

There are different terminals, all of them divided based on the type of cargo that passes through it. The ports are the point where the land and sea transits coincide for international imports and exports.

A wide range of storage options is also available in these ports. This is necessary because an eclectic mix of cargo passes through these terminals. Thus storage options include tanks for commodities like petroleum and oil, warehouses for automobiles, and even temperature controlled units for the storage of perishables like meat, poultry and vegetables.

The Port Finances

The most feasible and affordable method to import and export goods in large quantities is to use the waterways. The ports work efficiently enough and with enough facilities to make sure that there is no damage or loss to cargo. The federal government revenue went up to $2.5 billion and the revenue of the provincial government went up to $2.6 billion by 2003.